Will Malcolm Turnbull stand up for Australia on the TPP?

Sign the petition to Malcolm Turnbull & the Coalition

Petition Text:

Malcolm Turnbull & the Coalition: stand up for Australian democracy and stop the Trans Pacific Partnership."

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Goal: 200,000

In just over a week, Malcolm Turnbull's trade minister is heading to Auckland to sign the TPP -- the dangerous trade deal that will allow corporations to sue our government for billions, just for passing laws to protect our health or the environment.

World leaders are literally gambling away our future, and it's beyond ironic that the TPP will be signed in a casino.

Everything about this dangerous trade deal has been a secret from the very beginning -- and nothing's changed. Officials only recently confirmed the date and location of the signing.

The TPP's being kept under wraps because leaders are afraid of public opposition.

And you can bet we're not staying quiet. We're working with our partners to deliver a petition to MPs in Canberra on the day before the signing ceremony -- 3 February -- to show that there's a strong movement against the TPP. But for it to be really powerful, we need you to add your voice now.

Can you tell Malcolm Turnbull not to sign away our democratic rights and reject the TPP?

Malcolm Turnbull wants us to believe the TPP is all about getting a better deal for ordinary Australians. But the truth is that it is one of the biggest corporate power grabs in a generation.

Experts say deal will drive up the cost of crucial medicines, weaken workers' rights, and put corporations on the same level as sovereign countries, allowing them to sue in special courts for laws that might reduce their profits.

The final text has been agreed on, but it's not over yet. The TPP can only survive if the twelve member countries -- especially those with huge economies like the US and Japan -- formally agree on the deal in their home countries.

Right now, we're building global momentum against the deal and making sure there's a loud outcry at every stage possible. In the coming months, the SumOfUs community will be campaigning hard to stop the deal becoming local law in individual countries. We will make it too politically risky for leaders to go ahead.

This is our first opportunity of the year to show our opposition to the TPP -- and we have to make the most of it. The signing is happening soon and we need you to pull this off. Already, the SumOfUs community has stood with thousands of activists in all the TPP countries to come together and delay this sickening deal. And it's working.

Can you tell Malcolm Turnbull to reject the TPP now?


More information:

TPP will be signed in Auckland next month, Radio New Zealand, 21 January 2016
TPP trade deal: text published online, The Guardian, 5 November 2015

In just over a week, Malcolm Turnbull's trade minister is heading to Auckland to sign the TPP -- the dangerous trade deal that will allow corporations to sue our government for billions, just for passing laws to protect our health or the environment.

World leaders are literally gambling away our future, and it's beyond ironic that the TPP will be signed in a casino.

Everything about this dangerous trade deal has been a secret from the very beginning -- and nothing's changed. Officials only recently confirmed the date and location of the signing.

The TPP's being kept under wraps because leaders are afraid of public opposition.

And you can bet we're not staying quiet. We're working with our partners to deliver a petition to MPs in Canberra on the day before the signing ceremony -- 3 February -- to show that there's a strong movement against the TPP. But for it to be really powerful, we need you to add your voice now.

Can you tell Malcolm Turnbull not to sign away our democratic rights and reject the TPP?


More information:

TPP will be signed in Auckland next month, Radio New Zealand, 21 January 2016
TPP trade deal: text published online, The Guardian, 5 November 2015